Green, Blue Eggs a Lie Manipulating People in Turkey

These colorful eggs will be used by the children competing the Easter egg roll and will one day be part of one of their fondest memories. (Photo: AP Photo/ J. Scott Applewhite)
These colorful eggs will be used by the children competing the Easter egg roll and will one day be part of one of their fondest memories. (Photo: AP Photo/ J. Scott Applewhite)
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Green, Blue Eggs a Lie Manipulating People in Turkey

These colorful eggs will be used by the children competing the Easter egg roll and will one day be part of one of their fondest memories. (Photo: AP Photo/ J. Scott Applewhite)
These colorful eggs will be used by the children competing the Easter egg roll and will one day be part of one of their fondest memories. (Photo: AP Photo/ J. Scott Applewhite)

A type of greenish chicken eggs has become very popular in Turkey and it is being sold at a higher price than normal varieties because people believe it contains different types of vitamins and minerals, and is especially useful for babies and patients.

Turkish people have shown a remarkable interest in those eggs derived from a South American chicken because of their greenish color and say that it contains more vitamins and minerals than normal eggs.

"Greenish eggs are sold at a much higher price than local eggs," said Ibrahim Aijin, an egg merchant in Bursa, northwestern Turkey, noting that this is due to the common belief that it is beneficial for infants and patients.

He explained that the price of green eggs is higher because they come from a breed of South African chicken, pointing out that the price of one green egg is up to 7.5 Turkish lira (about two dollars), while a local egg costs between 50 pounds and one lira (12.5 - 25 cents).

The blue eggs are of another type that has recently spread in the country, and it is also reported to have a different content than white and brown eggs. The eggs also come from rare chicken breeds in Turkey raised by amateurs. Reportedly, one of its most important characteristic is its ability to drop cholesterol levels in blood.

Green and blue eggs were not widely spread, with some citizens buying their own chickens and keeping them in their ow
n farms or fields. However, recently, these colored eggs have been widely produced in farm production lines. Blue eggs are higher in demand than green eggs due to their scarcity and larger size.

It is nothing more than a lie that controls people’s minds, Dr. Mustafa Tayar, a professor at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at Uludağ University in Bursa, told the Anadolu Agency. He explained that green or blue eggs are no more than normal eggs deriving from South American chicken breeds, and they don’t contain any different or better minerals or vitamins.

Tayar pointed out that the content of green eggs and regular local eggs is the same, and said the claims about containing rich minerals and vitamins are a «myth», pointing out that the color of the eggshell varies according to the chicken breed, and does not add any other characteristics or specifications.



7-month-old Tree Kangaroo Peeks Out of Mom's Pouch at Bronx Zoo

This photo, provided by the Wildlife Conservation Society, shows a Matschie's tree kangaroo joey that made its first appearance from its mother's pouch at New York's Bronx Zoo, Thursday, July 18, 2024. (Wildlife Conservation Society/Terria Clay via AP)
This photo, provided by the Wildlife Conservation Society, shows a Matschie's tree kangaroo joey that made its first appearance from its mother's pouch at New York's Bronx Zoo, Thursday, July 18, 2024. (Wildlife Conservation Society/Terria Clay via AP)
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7-month-old Tree Kangaroo Peeks Out of Mom's Pouch at Bronx Zoo

This photo, provided by the Wildlife Conservation Society, shows a Matschie's tree kangaroo joey that made its first appearance from its mother's pouch at New York's Bronx Zoo, Thursday, July 18, 2024. (Wildlife Conservation Society/Terria Clay via AP)
This photo, provided by the Wildlife Conservation Society, shows a Matschie's tree kangaroo joey that made its first appearance from its mother's pouch at New York's Bronx Zoo, Thursday, July 18, 2024. (Wildlife Conservation Society/Terria Clay via AP)

The second baby of a tree-dwelling kangaroo made its public debut this week in New York, poking its pink head out of its mom's furry white pouch.

The tiny Matschie’s tree kangaroo, or Dendrolagus matschiei, was born in December and is the second born to the same mother since 2022. It also was the third of its kind born at the Bronx Zoo since 2008, The Associated Press reported.

The tree kangaroo species only gestate for about six weeks before they are born and immediately crawl into their marsupial moms' pouches, the zoo said in a statement. It takes around seven months for the young to start peeking out of the pouch.

There are only around 2,500 tree kangaroos in the wild and 42 in captivity, the zoo said. In a statement Friday, a Bronx Zoo spokesperson said that the kangaroo's birth was significant for the network of zoos that aims to preserve genetic diversity among endangered animals.

"It's a small population and because of that births are not very common," said Jessica Moody, curator of primates and small mammals at the Bronx Zoo. “So it's a rare and exciting event,” adding that baby tree kangaroos are “possibly one of the cutest animals to have ever lived. They look like stuffed animals, it's amazing.”

The tree kangaroos are native to the Huon Peninsula in Papua New Guinea, where they are threatened by human activities such as habitat destruction and hunting, the statement said. They live primarily in trees and are smaller than Australia’s better-known red kangaroo. An adult tree kangaroo weighs between 20 and 25 pounds (9–11 kilograms). The joeys are about the size of a human thumb when they are born, but grow to as long as 30 inches (76 centimeters).