Britain’s Prince Harry to Marry Meghan Markle in May 2018

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will marry on May 19, 2018. (Reuters)
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will marry on May 19, 2018. (Reuters)
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Britain’s Prince Harry to Marry Meghan Markle in May 2018

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will marry on May 19, 2018. (Reuters)
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will marry on May 19, 2018. (Reuters)

Britain's Prince Harry will marry American fiancee, Meghan Markle, on May 19, 2018, announced Kensington Palace on Friday.

Queen Elizabeth's grandson, fifth-in-line to the throne, and Markle, who stars in the US TV legal drama "Suits", announced their engagement last month with the marriage to take place in St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle.

"His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales and Ms. Meghan Markle will marry on 19th May 2018," Kensington Palace said in a statement.

The couple announced their engagement last month after an 18-month romance.

The 33-year-old prince, who is fifth in line to the British throne, and the 36-year-old American actress met through a mutual friend in 2016.

The couple have chosen to marry in Windsor, west of London, because it is "a special place for them". Harry's 91-year-old grandmother, Elizabeth, will attend the ceremony.

Markle intends to become a British citizen, though she will retain her US citizenship while she goes through the process.

The Gothic St. George's Chapel is located in the grounds of Windsor Castle, which has been the family home of British kings and queens for almost 1,000 years.

Within the chapel are the tombs of ten sovereigns, including Henry VIII and his third wife Jane Seymour, and Charles I.



Greece Battles Wildfires Fanned by Gale Force Winds

A plane drops water during a wildfire, in Kitsi, near the town of Koropi, Greece, June 19, 2024. (Reuters)
A plane drops water during a wildfire, in Kitsi, near the town of Koropi, Greece, June 19, 2024. (Reuters)
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Greece Battles Wildfires Fanned by Gale Force Winds

A plane drops water during a wildfire, in Kitsi, near the town of Koropi, Greece, June 19, 2024. (Reuters)
A plane drops water during a wildfire, in Kitsi, near the town of Koropi, Greece, June 19, 2024. (Reuters)

Hundreds of firefighters struggled on Saturday to contain wildfires fanned by gale force winds on two Greek islands and in other parts of Greece, as authorities warned many regions face a high risk of new blazes.

More than 30 firefighters backed by two aircraft and five helicopters were battling a wildfire burning οn the island of Andros in the Aegean, away from tourist resorts, where four communities were evacuated as a precaution.

"More firefighters (are) expected on the island later in the day," a fire services official told Reuters, adding there were no reports of damage or injuries.

Wildfires are common in Greece, but they have become more devastating in recent years amid hotter and drier summers that scientists link to climate change. A wildfire near Athens last week forced dozens to flee their homes, which authorities said they believed was the result of arson as well as the hot, dry conditions.

Meteorologists say the latest fires are the first time that the country has experienced "hot-dry-windy" conditions so early in the summer.

"I can't remember another year facing such conditions so early, in early and mid-June," meteorologist Thodoris Giannaros told state TV.

On Friday, a 55-year-old man died in hospital after being injured in a blaze in the region of Ilia on Greece's Peloponnese peninsula, as several fires burned on Greece's southern tip.

Several hundred firefighters have been deployed to battle more than 70 forest fires across the country since Friday. High winds and hot temperatures will extend the risk into Sunday, the fire service said.

Earlier on Saturday, firefighters tamed a forest fire on the island of Salamina, in the Saronic Gulf west of Athens, and another about 30 kilometers east of the capital.

After forest fires last year forced 19,000 people to flee the island of Rhodes and killed 20 in the northern mainland, Greece has scaled up its preparations this year by hiring more staff and stepping up training.