Türkiye Calls on Int’l Community to Contribute to Voluntary Return of Syrian Refugees

After winning the elections, the Turkish president reiterated his intention to work on the voluntarily return of the displaced Syrians to their country. (AP)
After winning the elections, the Turkish president reiterated his intention to work on the voluntarily return of the displaced Syrians to their country. (AP)
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Türkiye Calls on Int’l Community to Contribute to Voluntary Return of Syrian Refugees

After winning the elections, the Turkish president reiterated his intention to work on the voluntarily return of the displaced Syrians to their country. (AP)
After winning the elections, the Turkish president reiterated his intention to work on the voluntarily return of the displaced Syrians to their country. (AP)

Türkiye has called on the international community to cooperate in achieving the voluntary, safe and dignified return of Syrian refugees on its territory. At the same time, it confirmed that it would continue its operations targeting terrorist organizations at home and across borders.

The country’s National Security Council emphasized the importance of international cooperation in the issue of refugees, saying that it would contribute to achieving their voluntary, safe and dignified return to their homeland.

This came in a statement issued on Thursday evening, at the end of the first meeting of the newly-established council, after the recent presidential and parliamentary elections.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan had confirmed, after the first meeting of his new government on Tuesday, that Türkiye would return the Syrian refugees to their country in a safe, voluntary and honorable manner, saying: “We will encourage our brothers, who sought refuge in our country fleeing the war and the attacks of terrorist organizations, to voluntarily return to their homeland safely and honorably.”

During his electoral campaign, Erdogan pledged to return more than a million Syrian refugees to safe areas established by Türkiye in northern Syria, where it is building residential villages with services to accommodate them in conditions suitable for life and work.

“We will contribute to peace and stability on a global scale by maintaining our pioneering foreign policy and active humanitarianism,” he stated.

Türkiye places the return of refugees among the three main goals of negotiations to normalize relations with Syria, which also include cooperation in combating terrorism and advancing the political process to achieve stability and preserve the country’s unity.

Meanwhile, Ankara announced the arrest of a female official in the Kurdish People’s Protection Units in a joint operation of its intelligence with the pro-Turkish Syrian National Army, while she was trying to infiltrate from Manbij into Turkish territory.

On Friday, the official Anadolu Agency quoted security sources as saying that members of the Syrian National Army had arrested an official of the People’s Protection Units in the city of Manbij, after obtaining information from Turkish intelligence about her movements. She was later handed over to the Turkish security authorities.



IOM: At Least 43,059 People Displaced by Libya Floods

People sit among the rubble in Libya's eastern city of Derna on September 20, 2023, following a deadly flash flood. (Photo by Abu Bakr AL-SOUSSI / AFP)
People sit among the rubble in Libya's eastern city of Derna on September 20, 2023, following a deadly flash flood. (Photo by Abu Bakr AL-SOUSSI / AFP)
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IOM: At Least 43,059 People Displaced by Libya Floods

People sit among the rubble in Libya's eastern city of Derna on September 20, 2023, following a deadly flash flood. (Photo by Abu Bakr AL-SOUSSI / AFP)
People sit among the rubble in Libya's eastern city of Derna on September 20, 2023, following a deadly flash flood. (Photo by Abu Bakr AL-SOUSSI / AFP)

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) said on Thursday at least 43,059 people have been displaced by severe floods in northeastern Libya.

In a post on X, formerly known as Twitter, the IOM added that the lack of clean water supplies appeared to be driving many displaced people out of Derna to municipalities to the east and west of the Mediterranean city.

The country’s chief prosecutor, meanwhile, vowed to take “serious measures” to deliver justice for the victims of the floods, which devastated Derna more than a week ago.

Thousands of people were killed, with many dead still under the rubble or at sea, according to search teams. Government officials and aid agencies have given varied death tolls ranging from about 4,000 to over 11,000.

Local authorities said they have isolated the worst damaged part of Derna amid growing concerns about potential infection by waterborne diseases. Health authorities have launched a vaccination campaign that initially targeted search and rescue teamed along with children in Derna and other impacted areas.


'Like a Grave': Syrians Shelter Underground

Ahmad Khalil, 53, sits with his family in a cave he carved manually with his children in five years, near his original home in the mostly abandoned village of Kansafra, on September 10, 2023. (Photo by Omar HAJ KADOUR / AFP)
Ahmad Khalil, 53, sits with his family in a cave he carved manually with his children in five years, near his original home in the mostly abandoned village of Kansafra, on September 10, 2023. (Photo by Omar HAJ KADOUR / AFP)
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'Like a Grave': Syrians Shelter Underground

Ahmad Khalil, 53, sits with his family in a cave he carved manually with his children in five years, near his original home in the mostly abandoned village of Kansafra, on September 10, 2023. (Photo by Omar HAJ KADOUR / AFP)
Ahmad Khalil, 53, sits with his family in a cave he carved manually with his children in five years, near his original home in the mostly abandoned village of Kansafra, on September 10, 2023. (Photo by Omar HAJ KADOUR / AFP)

In a battered village in Syria's last main opposition bastion, one resident has hewn a bomb shelter out of rock to stay on his land and protect his family from attacks.

Kansafra, in the south of Idlib province, often comes under Syrian army fire targeting militants who control the area, while Russian warplanes circle above and carry out airstrikes in support of ally Damascus.

Many families have fled the village, located less than two kilometers from the front lines.

Now, just a few shops remain open, while heavily damaged buildings line the streets.

But Ahmad Khalil, 53, would not leave.

"People keep telling us to go to a camp for displaced people, but these camps are a thousand times worse," he said.

Khalil carved out the shelter next to his house in 2017.

Winding, narrow steps lead down to a small room with a low, curved roof, illuminated with sunlight from a shaft and a dim lamp.

"I prefer to stay here under the bombs," he said, even though the shelter is "like a grave".

held Idlib region in Syria's northwest is home to about three million people, around half of them displaced from other parts of the country during more than a decade of conflict.

Many live in impoverished tented settlements, dependent on international aid.

Hayat Tahrir al-Sham controls swathes of Idlib, as well as parts of the adjacent provinces of Aleppo, Hama and Latakia.

Fighting has intensified in recent weeks, so Khalil's family has been spending more time underground.

Whenever they hear shelling or warplanes, they run to the shelter.

"There are always aircraft flying over the village and the area, it never stops. The life we lead is worse than death," said Khalil, who has two wives and seven children.

Mostly bereft of furniture, the shelter is covered with basic floor mats. Jars of vine leaves and other fermented vegetables are stored in the cool of the underground cave.

Buying bread means a walk to the nearest shop, at constant risk of attack.

In the family's somber shelter, two of Khalil's young sons played with toys on the ground.

"My children dream of living like any other children -- of going out and playing outside," said the father.

But here, "there are no other children for them to play with... and the entire region is in ruins," he added.

"This is no life."


Egyptian, Iranian Foreign Ministers Discuss Bilateral Relations in New York

Egyptian FM Sameh Shoukry and his Iranian counterpart Hossein Amir Abdollahian during their meeting in New York (Egyptian Foreign Ministry)
Egyptian FM Sameh Shoukry and his Iranian counterpart Hossein Amir Abdollahian during their meeting in New York (Egyptian Foreign Ministry)
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Egyptian, Iranian Foreign Ministers Discuss Bilateral Relations in New York

Egyptian FM Sameh Shoukry and his Iranian counterpart Hossein Amir Abdollahian during their meeting in New York (Egyptian Foreign Ministry)
Egyptian FM Sameh Shoukry and his Iranian counterpart Hossein Amir Abdollahian during their meeting in New York (Egyptian Foreign Ministry)

Egypt's Foreign Minister, Sameh Shoukry, received his Iranian counterpart, Hossein Amir Abdollahian, at Egypt's permanent mission to the UN in New York on Wednesday.

According to the Egyptian Foreign Ministry, the meeting addressed bilateral ties and explored the foundations and guidelines governing them.

The meeting aimed to develop relations to serve the interests of both the Egyptian and Iranian peoples, founded on principles of mutual respect, good neighborliness, cooperation, and non-interference in the internal affairs of states.

The Iranian Foreign Minister emphasized his country's aspiration to promote its relationship with Egypt, restoring it to its normal path in line with the history and civilization of the two countries.

He highlighted that the meeting is an essential step toward normalizing relations.

The meeting also tackled several regional issues, the Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesperson said.

Both sides affirmed their aspiration to achieve stability and enhance security in their regional environment.

Shoukry pointed out that the complexity of the region's crises cast dangerous shadows over the stability and living conditions of its people.

He underlined the importance of cooperation with all countries in the region in the face of ongoing instability.

Both ministers agreed to maintain communication and dialogue on various topics of mutual interest at bilateral, regional, and international levels.


Int’l Support Grows for Beirut Port Blast Fact-Finding Mission

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Volker Türk
UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Volker Türk
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Int’l Support Grows for Beirut Port Blast Fact-Finding Mission

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Volker Türk
UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Volker Türk

A deadlock in the judicial probe into the Beirut port explosion, which has persisted for nearly two years, has prompted discussions of an international initiative to form a fact-finding mission.

This initiative aims to break the judicial paralysis and rekindle hope for the families seeking the truth and an understanding of the underlying causes of the catastrophe that had taken place.

During a recent session held in Geneva, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Volker Türk, called for the necessity of international action regarding the August 4, 2020, explosion at the Beirut port that killed at least 220 people, wounded thousands, and damaged swathes of the city.

The blast was set off by a fire at a warehouse detonating hundreds of tons of ammonium nitrate.

Türk denounced the lack of accountability on the part of Lebanese authorities regarding those involved in the blast.

On the occasion of the 78th UN General Assembly session, 67 Lebanese lawmakers signed a petition and sent it to the United Nations, non-governmental groups, and human rights organizations.

They asked the UN to help Lebanon create a commission to investigate the blast.

This action received support from the victims’ families, who had also collectively sent a similar petition to the ambassadors of major countries, urging them to speed up the formation of the commission.

A group representing the families of those affected by the port blast, along with lawyer Camille Abu Sleiman, had started talking to ambassadors from countries with permanent seats on the UN Security Council.

They want to encourage the establishment of a fact-finding mission and present the petition, which most members of the Lebanese parliament have signed.

In remarks to Asharq Al-Awsat, Abu Sleiman explained that he was hopeful.

He mentioned that this mission could be set up in different ways, either through a decision by UN Secretary-General António Guterres, the Security Council, or the General Assembly.


Report: Ukraine Likely Behind Attacks on RSF in Sudan for Receiving Assistance from Wagner

Sudan’s Rapid Support Forces (AP)
Sudan’s Rapid Support Forces (AP)
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Report: Ukraine Likely Behind Attacks on RSF in Sudan for Receiving Assistance from Wagner

Sudan’s Rapid Support Forces (AP)
Sudan’s Rapid Support Forces (AP)

Ukrainian special services were likely behind a series of recent attacks on the Wagner-backed Rapid Support Forces (RSF) near Sudan’s capital, CNN reported on Wednesday.

The attacks raise the prospect that the fallout from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has spread far from the frontlines.

Speaking to CNN, a Ukrainian military source described the operation as the work of a “non-Sudanese military.” Pressed on whether Kyiv was behind the attacks, the source would only say that “Ukrainian special services were likely responsible.”

The operation involved a series of attacks on the RSF paramilitary group, which is believed to be receiving assistance from Wagner, the Russian mercenary group, in its fight against the Sudanese army for control of the country.

CNN said it was unable to independently confirm Ukraine’s involvement in the series of strikes. But video footage obtained by CNN pointed to the Ukrainian-style drone attacks in Omdurman and other cities.

Experts also said the tactics used – namely the pattern of drones swooping directly into their target – were highly unusual in Sudan and the wider African region.

CNN added that the videos showed that two commercially available drones widely used by Ukrainians were involved in at least eight of the strikes, with Ukrainian text seen on the drone controller.

The two drones are known as the First-person view (FPV) and the DJI MAVIC 3.

The DJI MAVIC 3 drone has a maximum flight distance of 30 kilometers, a video transmission range of 15 kilometers and 46 minutes of flying time, which would indicate that the pilot would have been operating the drone inside, or very close to, the city of Omdurman.

A high-level Sudanese military source said he had “no knowledge of a Ukrainian operation in Sudan” and did not believe it was true.

The powerful Russian mercenary group has played a public and pivotal role in Moscow’s foreign military campaigns, namely in Ukraine, and has repeatedly been accused of committing atrocities.

In Africa, it has helped to prop up Moscow’s growing influence and seizing of resources.

The Wagner Group first appeared in Sudan in 2017 after former President Omar Bashir's visit to Moscow, where he asked for security and military assistance from Russian President Vladimir Putin, in exchange for providing Russia a naval military base in Port Sudan.

At the time, the Meroe Gold company was founded to supervise the extraction of gold from Sudan’s mine. The company was part of the empire of the mercenary group’s late leader Yevgeny Prigozhin, who consolidated control over Wagner’s activities in Africa.

Several sides accuse the Wagner group of building a close relationship with RSF paramilitary fighters and their leader Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo – widely known as Hemedti.

Five months after the war broke out in Sudan between the army and the RSF paramilitary group, in mid-April, neither side appeared close to a decisive military victory. Meanwhile, the humanitarian suffering of the majority of Sudanese continues and threatens to consume the entire country.


Syrian President Arrives in China on First Visit since the Beginning of War in Syria

FILE - In this photo released on Nov. 9, 2019 by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrian President Bashar Assad speaks in Damascus, Syria. (SANA via AP, File)
FILE - In this photo released on Nov. 9, 2019 by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrian President Bashar Assad speaks in Damascus, Syria. (SANA via AP, File)
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Syrian President Arrives in China on First Visit since the Beginning of War in Syria

FILE - In this photo released on Nov. 9, 2019 by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrian President Bashar Assad speaks in Damascus, Syria. (SANA via AP, File)
FILE - In this photo released on Nov. 9, 2019 by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrian President Bashar Assad speaks in Damascus, Syria. (SANA via AP, File)

Syrian President Bashar Assad arrived in China on Thursday on his first visit to the country since the start of Syria's 12-year conflict during which Beijing has been one of his main backers.
China’s foreign ministry said Assad would attend the opening ceremony of the Asian Games, an international sports event beginning Saturday in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou.
China has been expanding its reach in the Middle East after mediating a deal in March between Saudi Arabia and Iran, and it continues to support Assad in the Syrian conflict, which has killed half a million people and left large parts of the nation in ruins, The Associated Press said.
China could play a major role in the future in Syria’s reconstruction, which is expected to cost tens of billions of dollars. Syria last year joined China’s Belt and Road Initiative in which Beijing expands its influence in developing regions through infrastructure projects.
Assad’s office said earlier that the Syrian leader was invited by Chinese President Xi Jinping and would bring with him a high-ranking Syrian delegation.
Syria’s worsening economic crisis has led to protests in government-held parts of the country. Syria blames the crisis on Western sanctions and US-backed Kurdish-led fighters who control the country’s largest oil fields in the east near the border with Iraq.
Diplomatic contacts between Syria and other Arab countries have intensified following the Feb. 6 earthquake that hit Türkiye and Syria killing more than 50,000 people, including over 6,000 in Syria. Assad flew to Saudi Arabia in May where he attended the Arab League summit days after Syria’s membership was reinstated in the 22-member league.
Since Syria’s conflict began in March 2011 with pro-democracy protests and later turned into a civil war, Iran and Russia have helped Assad regain control of much of the country.
China has used its veto power at the UN eight times to stop resolutions against Assad’s government, the latest in July 2020.
Assad’s last and only visit to China was in 2004, a year after the US-led invasion of neighboring Iraq and at a time when Washington was putting pressure on Syria.


Yemeni Diplomatic Push in New York Seeks Crucial Peace Support

Yemeni Presidential Leadership Council (PLC) President Rashad al-Alimi receives UAE Foreign Minister in New York (SABA)
Yemeni Presidential Leadership Council (PLC) President Rashad al-Alimi receives UAE Foreign Minister in New York (SABA)
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Yemeni Diplomatic Push in New York Seeks Crucial Peace Support

Yemeni Presidential Leadership Council (PLC) President Rashad al-Alimi receives UAE Foreign Minister in New York (SABA)
Yemeni Presidential Leadership Council (PLC) President Rashad al-Alimi receives UAE Foreign Minister in New York (SABA)

At the UN General Assembly in New York, Yemeni Presidential Leadership Council (PLC) President Rashad al-Alimi highlighted his country’s crisis, rallying global backing to pressure Houthi insurgents for a durable, comprehensive peace.

Alimi continued his meetings in New York, which included discussions with the Secretary-General of the Arab League, the UAE Foreign Minister, and UN officials, as reported by Yemeni official sources.

During his meeting with Ahmed Aboul Gheit, the Secretary-General of the Arab League, Alimi discussed the Yemeni situation and the mediation efforts by Saudi Arabia and Oman to renew the ceasefire and launch a comprehensive political process under UN guidance.

PLC Vice President Aidarous al-Zubaidi attended the meeting with Aboul Gheit.

Additionally, Alimi met with Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan, the UAE Minister of Foreign Affairs, and updated him on the Yemeni situation and the prospects for achieving a fair and comprehensive peace based on agreed-upon national, regional, and international frameworks.

Alimi also had discussions with Achim Steiner, the Administrator of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP).

In those discussions, Alimi focused on various UN development interventions and coordinated efforts with the international community to secure additional funding for more sustainable and effective programs in Yemen.

Alimi also praised the UN’s shift from relief to sustainable development and shared his observations regarding certain UN interventions, including the necessity to halt support directed towards the Houthis in the field of mine clearance.

In other news, Yemeni Foreign Minister Ahmed bin Mubarak emphasized that the food security crisis in his country is a direct result of the nearly nine-year-long war waged by the Houthis.

He pointed out that understanding the root causes of this crisis and the deterioration of essential services in the country are crucial elements in finding a solution.


Lebanon Begins Investigating Shooting Outside US Embassy that Caused No Injuries

The new US embassy in Lebanon (US embassy Beirut Twitter account)
The new US embassy in Lebanon (US embassy Beirut Twitter account)
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Lebanon Begins Investigating Shooting Outside US Embassy that Caused No Injuries

The new US embassy in Lebanon (US embassy Beirut Twitter account)
The new US embassy in Lebanon (US embassy Beirut Twitter account)

Lebanon’s security agencies have launched an investigation into a late night shooting outside the US embassy in Lebanon that caused no injuries, officials said Thursday.
No one claimed responsibility for the Wednesday night small arms fire in the vicinity of the entrance of the heavily-fortified compound in Beirut’s northeastern suburb of Awkar. It was not immediately clear if the incident was a politically-motivated attack, said The Associated Press.
US Embassy spokesperson Jake Nelson said that “there were no injuries, and our facility is safe.” He added: “We are in close contact with host country law enforcement authorities.”
Shortly after the shooting, the Lebanese army took measures near the embassy and later security agencies started an investigation including analyzing security cameras in the area, a Lebanese official said on condition of anonymity in line with regulations.
This year marked the 40th anniversary of a deadly bombing attack on the US Embassy in Beirut on April 18, 1983, that killed 63 people including at least 17 Americans. Top CIA officials were among those killed in the 1983 embassy attack in a Beirut coastal neighborhood. US officials blamed the militant group Hezbollah.
In recent years there have been no reported attacks on the embassy although Lebanon has a long history of attacks against Americans since the 1975-90 civil war started.
In 2008, an explosion targeted a US Embassy vehicle in northern Beirut, killing at least three Lebanese and injuring an American bystander and a local embassy employee. The blast, which damaged the armored SUV and several other vehicles, took place just ahead of a farewell reception for the American ambassador at a hotel in central Beirut.
In October 1983, a truck bombing killed 241 American service members at the US Marine barracks at Beirut airport.
In 1976, the US Ambassador to Lebanon, Francis E. Meloy Jr., and an aide, Robert O. Waring, were kidnapped and shot to death in Beirut. In 1984, William Buckley, CIA station chief in Beirut, was kidnapped and murdered by the Jihad group.
The US withdrew all diplomats from Beirut in September 1989 and did not reopen its embassy until 1991.


Israeli Intelligence Threatens Commander of Imam Hussein Brigade in Syria

A photo from an account called Imam Hussein Brigade on Instagram (Asharq Al-Awsat)
A photo from an account called Imam Hussein Brigade on Instagram (Asharq Al-Awsat)
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Israeli Intelligence Threatens Commander of Imam Hussein Brigade in Syria

A photo from an account called Imam Hussein Brigade on Instagram (Asharq Al-Awsat)
A photo from an account called Imam Hussein Brigade on Instagram (Asharq Al-Awsat)

The Israeli army’s military intelligence sent warnings to the pro-Iran Imam Hussein Brigade - which is made up of sub-units operating in Syria - and accused the militias of recruiting thousands of soldiers to conduct strikes against Israel.

Israeli intelligence officers said that a unit comprising one thousand members was currently a source of concern for AMAN (the Military Intelligence Division of the Israeli Army), and was practically considered a branch of the Lebanese Hezbollah.

According to the officers, the unit owns Iranian-made drones and surface-to-surface and surface-to-air missiles, while its soldiers are well trained, have military patrols and fortified positions, and act like a small army.

The Israeli foreign intelligence service (Mossad) has begun investigating weapons smuggling operations through Syria and the Jordanian border to Palestinian armed organizations in the West Bank.

The Israeli Army Radio, Galei Tsahal, reported on Tuesday a significant increase in smuggling operations, in terms of quantity and types of weapons. The channel quoted a senior official in the Israeli security services as saying that the last few weeks witnessed the thwarting of two attempts to smuggle weapons across the Jordanian-Israeli border in the Jordan Valley region.

One of these operations was described as “large and exceptional,” and included powerful and sophisticated explosive devices. Israel is investigating the possibility of Iran’s involvement.

In earlier statements, Defense Minister Yoav Gallant said that Israel “is aware of the increasing involvement of Iran and terrorist organizations in attempts to transfer weapons and knowledge (i.e. expertise related to weapons manufacturing) to the West Bank.”

Israeli army reports indicate that the Imam Hussein Brigade was carrying out hostile activity against Israel, including weapons smuggling. Particular focus was placed on the commander of this brigade, called Zulfiqar Hanawi, 42, a Lebanese affiliated with Hezbollah, who led a military division that was fighting in Aleppo in 2013.

According to the reports, Hanawi “works relentlessly to develop the capabilities of his forces and carry out bold operations against American forces, terrorist organizations, Israel, and even against opposition forces (in Syria). He is also involved in importing weapons from Iran and hiding them in Syria or Lebanon.”

Some AMAN officers describe him as the successor of IRGC Commander Qassem Soleimani, who was killed in a US operation near Baghdad airport at the beginning of 2021.


Yemen's Presidential Leadership Calls for Support, Pressuring Houthis

Yemeni Presidential Leadership Council (PLC) President Rashad al-Alimi, during his meeting with US Secretary of State Antony Blinken
Yemeni Presidential Leadership Council (PLC) President Rashad al-Alimi, during his meeting with US Secretary of State Antony Blinken
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Yemen's Presidential Leadership Calls for Support, Pressuring Houthis

Yemeni Presidential Leadership Council (PLC) President Rashad al-Alimi, during his meeting with US Secretary of State Antony Blinken
Yemeni Presidential Leadership Council (PLC) President Rashad al-Alimi, during his meeting with US Secretary of State Antony Blinken

Yemeni Presidential Leadership Council (PLC) President Rashad al-Alimi accused the Houthi group of obliterating decades of developments in the country since their coup.

Speaking at the Sustainable Development Goals Summit on the sidelines of the 78th UN General Assembly meetings in New York, Alimi urged the international community to push the Houthis toward peace.

The Yemeni official called for intensified pressure on the Houthis to end the politicization of humanitarian issues, asserting that this is as important as humanitarian aid.

He explained that Yemen is lagging in its development commitments due to the strains of war and a deepening humanitarian crisis that the Iran-backed Houthi militias continue exacerbating for the ninth consecutive year.

Alimi added that the war has shifted developmental priorities in Yemen, especially in light of the cessation of oil exports for an entire year following Houthi attacks on export ports and international shipping lanes.

Discussing sustainable development objectives, which involve widespread societal participation in decision-making, production, and employing technology for job creation and improving life quality, the Yemeni leader stressed that such discussions are now impossible in densely populated militia-controlled areas.

He blamed the Houthi group for barring life-saving vaccines from reaching their territories, leading to a resurgence of deadly diseases eradicated two decades ago.

- Destruction of achievements

Alimi discussed the impacts of the Houthi war and its dire consequences across various service, developmental, and humanitarian sectors.

Recently, he said millions of Yemeni students returned to school under extremely harsh conditions, adding that the governmental protection network that should be bolstering the education sector has collapsed.

He emphasized that the Houthis' actions have destroyed Yemen's economic achievements over the past decades.

- Diplomatic Initiatives

He held a series of meetings with UN and international officials in New York to shed light on the crisis in Yemen and pressure the Houthi rebels to embrace peace, according to official sources.

Alimi and PLC Vice President Aidrous al-Zubaidi met with the US Secretary of State, Anthony Blinken.

They discussed the evolving situation in Yemen and the commendable mediation efforts led by Saudi Arabia and Oman to renew the truce and initiate a comprehensive political process under the UN's auspices.

Alimi acknowledged the US humanitarian interventions to alleviate the hardships intensified by Houthi attacks on oil installations and international shipping routes.

Additionally, he met with the UN Under-Secretary-General, Vladimir Voronkov, and discussed the wide-ranging implications of the Houthi war.

State-owned Saba news agency reported that Alimi briefed the UN official on the escalating threats fuelled by the Houthi militias.

He highlighted the need for international support to rebuild the state institutions, law enforcement agencies, counterterrorism, and organized crime authorities and enhance their capability to counter security threats in coordination with regional allies and international partners.

Furthermore, Alimi met with the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) Managing Director, Kristalina Georgieva, addressing the economic and humanitarian situation in Yemen.

Yemen's official media reported that Alimi discussed with international officials the humanitarian consequences of the Houthi attacks on oil facilities and discussed the required international support for the Yemeni government to fulfill its obligations.

The head of Yemen's governing council expressed appreciation for the facilities provided by the IMF, notably its Special Drawing Rights (SDR).

He indicated his openness to various offers to mobilize global support alongside government reforms and measures in coordination with regional and international allies.

Alimi lauded the generous Saudi support for Yemen's state budget and its pivotal role in stabilizing Yemen's economic and service sectors.