Egypt Unveils Recently Discovered Ancient Workshops, Tombs in Saqqara Necropolis

An Egyptian antiquities worker brushes a recently unearthed embalming bed at the site of the Step Pyramid of Djoser in Saqqara, 24 kilometers (15 miles) southwest of Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, May 27, 2023. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
An Egyptian antiquities worker brushes a recently unearthed embalming bed at the site of the Step Pyramid of Djoser in Saqqara, 24 kilometers (15 miles) southwest of Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, May 27, 2023. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
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Egypt Unveils Recently Discovered Ancient Workshops, Tombs in Saqqara Necropolis

An Egyptian antiquities worker brushes a recently unearthed embalming bed at the site of the Step Pyramid of Djoser in Saqqara, 24 kilometers (15 miles) southwest of Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, May 27, 2023. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
An Egyptian antiquities worker brushes a recently unearthed embalming bed at the site of the Step Pyramid of Djoser in Saqqara, 24 kilometers (15 miles) southwest of Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, May 27, 2023. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

Egyptian antiquities authorities Saturday unveiled ancient workshops and tombs they say were discovered recently at a Pharaonic necropolis just outside the capital Cairo.

The spaces were found in the sprawling necropolis of Saqqara, which is a part of Egypt’s ancient capital of Memphis, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Mostafa Waziri, secretary-general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, said the workshops had been used to mummify humans and sacred animals. They date back to the 30th Pharaonic Dynasty (380 BC to 343 BC) and Ptolemaic period (305 BC to 30 BC), he said.

Inside the workshops, archaeologists found clay pots and other items apparently used in mummification, as well as ritual vessels, Waziri said.

The tombs, meanwhile, were for a top official from the Old Kingdom of ancient Egypt, and a priest from the New Kingdom, according to Sabri Farag, head of the Saqqara archaeological site.



Medieval Mummies 'Beyond Repair' after Dublin Church Fire

Police in Ireland. Reuters file photo
Police in Ireland. Reuters file photo
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Medieval Mummies 'Beyond Repair' after Dublin Church Fire

Police in Ireland. Reuters file photo
Police in Ireland. Reuters file photo

Five medieval mummies preserved in the crypt of a Dublin church have likely been damaged beyond repair by a fire and water used to douse the flames, a church official said on Wednesday.
The five sets of remains, preserved for hundreds of years in the crypt of the 11th century St. Michan's Church in central Dublin, include the remains of a crusader and are a tourist attraction in the city, Reuters reported.
An intruder broke into the crypt on Tuesday afternoon and started the fire and firefighters used water to put it out, the Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin, Michael Jackson, told RTE radio.
"The combination of fire and water have done significant damage to the mummies... I honestly don't know exactly what the extent of that is, but my fear like that of others is that the damage is irreparable," Jackson said.
The remains are due to be examined by experts from the National Museum of Ireland to see if anything can be salvaged, he said.
The vicar of the church, David Pierpoint, told RTE he thought the mummies were "beyond repair."