L’Oreal Shares Shine After Sales Beat Expectations 

A cosmetic display of French cosmetics group L'Oreal is seen at a duty free shop at the Nice International Airport, in Nice, France, October 10, 2018. (Reuters)
A cosmetic display of French cosmetics group L'Oreal is seen at a duty free shop at the Nice International Airport, in Nice, France, October 10, 2018. (Reuters)
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L’Oreal Shares Shine After Sales Beat Expectations 

A cosmetic display of French cosmetics group L'Oreal is seen at a duty free shop at the Nice International Airport, in Nice, France, October 10, 2018. (Reuters)
A cosmetic display of French cosmetics group L'Oreal is seen at a duty free shop at the Nice International Airport, in Nice, France, October 10, 2018. (Reuters)

Shares in L'Oreal rose more than 4% in early Friday trading after the French cosmetics giant beat expectations with a strong rise in first quarter sales on Thursday evening, allaying concerns about a slowdown in the United States.

L'Oreal shares were up 5.0% at 0745 GMT having lost 6% this year up to Thursday's close.

"A rock solid quarter, despite concerns," said analysts at Barclays. While L'Oreal did acknowledge a slowdown in the United States, it "comfortably surprised to the upside," both in the US and Europe, they said.

The world's biggest beauty company reported more than 12% sales growth in both North America and Europe, lifted by its mass market range and dermatological products, which helped offset weakness in the luxury segment.

"L'Oreal delivered a strong beat," Bernstein analysts wrote in a note to investors.

They noted L'Oreal's ability to shift investments in advertising and promotions to different parts of the world and across categories and demographics, enabling it to optimize global growth and make it more resilient.



Italy’s Benetton Plans Restructuring as Losses Mount, Sources Say

A logo of United Colors of Benetton is seen in front of a store in Rome, Italy, July 21, 2020. (Reuters)
A logo of United Colors of Benetton is seen in front of a store in Rome, Italy, July 21, 2020. (Reuters)
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Italy’s Benetton Plans Restructuring as Losses Mount, Sources Say

A logo of United Colors of Benetton is seen in front of a store in Rome, Italy, July 21, 2020. (Reuters)
A logo of United Colors of Benetton is seen in front of a store in Rome, Italy, July 21, 2020. (Reuters)

Italy's Benetton family is readying plans to address mounting losses at its eponymous clothing retailer, including parting ways with CEO Massimo Renon after four years, two people close to the group said on Monday.

The board of the clothing group is expected to meet on Tuesday to discuss a net loss of around 230 million euros ($250 million) for 2023 which includes impairments, a source with knowledge of the matter told Reuters.

That compares with a net loss of 81 million euros in 2022, when revenues totaled 1 billion euros.

Benetton shareholders are then scheduled to meet on June 18, at which time Renon's CEO mandate will not be renewed, the two sources said.

Renon, who built his career in the eyewear industry working at Luxottica, Safilo and Marcolin, declined to comment.

The Benettons own the clothing group made famous by its colorful jumpers and provocative advertising campaigns through their Edizione holding company.

Edizione is preparing to back a restructuring of the clothing retailer and to inject 260 million euros, one of the sources said, adding that Edizione would exert closer control over the group.

Benetton has struggled to withstand growing competition from fast-fashion giants such as Zara owner Inditex which have developed a nimbler production and distribution model, able to more quickly respond to consumers' changing tastes.

In an interview with Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera on Saturday, Chairman Luciano Benetton, one of its founders, said the group had been expected to break even in 2023 under a three-year strategic plan, but a worse than expected financial situation had emerged in recent months.

Luciano Benetton told Corriere that current management, led by Renon, had surprised the board by unveiling a "dramatic" shortfall.

Founded in 1965 by Italy's Benetton family as a clothing manufacturer, Benetton expanded to trade through around 4,000 shops globally, according to its website. After listing the group in Milan in 1986, the Benettons took it private in 2012, the last year in which it made a profit.