Libya: ISIS Kills 2 in Attack on Police Station

Smoke rises from a ruined house after it was hit by an air strike as fighters from Libyan forces allied with the UN-backed government advance into the last area controlled by ISIS, in Sirte, Libya, October 14, 2016. (Reuters)
Smoke rises from a ruined house after it was hit by an air strike as fighters from Libyan forces allied with the UN-backed government advance into the last area controlled by ISIS, in Sirte, Libya, October 14, 2016. (Reuters)
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Libya: ISIS Kills 2 in Attack on Police Station

Smoke rises from a ruined house after it was hit by an air strike as fighters from Libyan forces allied with the UN-backed government advance into the last area controlled by ISIS, in Sirte, Libya, October 14, 2016. (Reuters)
Smoke rises from a ruined house after it was hit by an air strike as fighters from Libyan forces allied with the UN-backed government advance into the last area controlled by ISIS, in Sirte, Libya, October 14, 2016. (Reuters)

ISIS terrorists have killed two policemen and injured several others at a checkpoint east of the Libyan city of Ajdabiya.

The attack also led to the destruction of a military armored vehicle and an ambulance, and the seizure of some equipment.

The heavy clashes with the army also resulted in the death of 12 members of the terrorist organization.

The attack took place early on Tuesday in the eastern town of Aqilah when armed men attacked the policemen manning the checkpoint, and the group later attacked a police station and burned several police and ambulance vehicles, according to sources.

The attack is not the first of its kind in the city.

On May 22, ISIS used a car bomb on the 60th gate, south of the city, which coincided with another attack on the eastern gate of Ujlah, killing two soldiers of Battalion 152.

Ajdabiya’s Security Department revealed details of the incident in Aqilah, saying that the two soldiers killed in "the treacherous attack launched by ISIS” were Osman Issa al-Zawawi and Abdul Rahim Awad al-Denglawi al-Qabaeli. Security forces also found five bombs prepared for detonation.

Commander of Battalion 141, Brigadier General Abdullah Naji and a team of military engineering arrived at the scene and dismantled the bombs.

The Security Directorate continued that “Ajdabiya operations pursued the terrorists, and clashed with them in the area of al-Jafr, south of Aqilah, during which soldier Qabaeli was killed.”.

Al-Shaheed Hospital in Ajdabiya announced that it had received the bodies of two dead soldiers and three wounded. Local media reported that the ISIS terrorists “slit a police officer’s throat” and killed another, and the group later attacked a police station, raised the ISIS flag atop the building and burned several police and ambulance vehicles.

Al-Wasat media outlet quoted the head of the police station, Major Meftah Rahil, as saying that ISIS members also kidnapped a citizen who was driving a minibus and made sure to shoot a video of the highway before leaving.

However, Ajdabiya Operations denied claims that Othman al-Zawawi had his throat slit and confirmed that he “was shot dead”.



WHO Says Many People in Gaza Facing ‘Famine-like Conditions’

Israeli soldiers operate inside the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, on Feb. 13, 2024. (AP)
Israeli soldiers operate inside the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, on Feb. 13, 2024. (AP)
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WHO Says Many People in Gaza Facing ‘Famine-like Conditions’

Israeli soldiers operate inside the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, on Feb. 13, 2024. (AP)
Israeli soldiers operate inside the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, on Feb. 13, 2024. (AP)

The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Wednesday that many people in Gaza were facing "catastrophic hunger and famine-like conditions".

"A significant proportion of Gaza's population is now facing catastrophic hunger and famine-like conditions," said WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

"Despite reports of increased delivery of food, there is currently no evidence that those who need it most are receiving sufficient quantity and quality of food."

Tedros said there were more than 8,000 children under five years old who have been diagnosed and treated for acute malnutrition, including 1,600 children with severe acute malnutrition.

"However, due to insecurity and lack of access, only two stabilization centers for severely malnourished patients can operate," he added.

"Our inability to provide health services safely, combined with the lack of clean water and sanitation, significantly increases the risk of malnourished children."

The war in Gaza began on Oct. 7 when fighters led by Hamas killed 1,200 Israelis and took more than 250 hostage, according to Israeli tallies.

Israel's response has caused the deaths of more than 37,000 Palestinians, according to the Gazan health ministry, displaced most of Gaza's population of 2.3 million and caused widespread hunger and destruction.

A UN inquiry on Wednesday found that both Israel and Hamas had committed war crimes early in the Gaza war, and that Israel's actions also constituted crimes against humanity because of the immense civilian losses.

Tedros also highlighted a separate health crisis in the West Bank, where he said healthcare had been targeted by nearly 500 attacks since Oct. 7.

"While the world's focus has been on Gaza, there is also an escalating health crisis in the West Bank, where attacks on healthcare and restrictions on movement of people are obstructing access to health services," he said.

"In most areas of the West Bank, clinics are only operating two days a week and hospitals are operating at about 70% capacity."