Israel Concerned about US Dealing with Palestinian Authority as State

Houses are seen in the Jewish settlement of Itamar, near Nablus in the Israeli-occupied West Bank June 15, 2020. (Reuters)
Houses are seen in the Jewish settlement of Itamar, near Nablus in the Israeli-occupied West Bank June 15, 2020. (Reuters)
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Israel Concerned about US Dealing with Palestinian Authority as State

Houses are seen in the Jewish settlement of Itamar, near Nablus in the Israeli-occupied West Bank June 15, 2020. (Reuters)
Houses are seen in the Jewish settlement of Itamar, near Nablus in the Israeli-occupied West Bank June 15, 2020. (Reuters)

Political sources in Tel Aviv have voiced concern over the United States dealing with Palestine “as if it were a state.”

This was revealed in the US State Department’s “2020 Fiscal Transparency Report,” in which it assesses countries that receive US assistance and whether they meet the minimum fiscal transparency requirements, as well as means of fighting corruption in these states.

The name mentioned in the US list did not specify Palestine and did not refer to it as a state, it instead referred to it as the “Palestinian Authority” (PA).

The list included the PA as one of other 64 states that do not meet the minimum fiscal transparency requirements, compared to 76 countries that do, according to Washington.

This has prompted the ruling right-wing in Israel to respond with concern about the list even though Washington, of course, has not officially recognized Palestine as a state.

According to Israel’s Maariv newspaper, Israeli officials have expressed concern and shock over the document, saying they know how things are run in the US.

“Nothing is coincidental in the US administration,” the officials noted.

They stressed that the mere listing of the PA as one of 141 assessed countries is considered a message that reflects a new American approach that considers it a state.

The Israeli government still suffers sharp differences among the parties over US President Donald Trump's so-called Deal of the Century Middle East peace proposal and the annexation plan it includes.

The plan stipulates annexing about 30 percent of the Israeli-occupied West Bank, most notably parts the Jordan Valley, the northern Dead Sea and lands on which settlements are built, and imposing Israel’s sovereignty over these areas.

Blue and White party’s Minister of Science and Technology Izhar Shay slammed Friday the unilateral annexation, stressing that “it does not serve Israel’s security and strategic interests.”

He expressed support for Trump’s “peace plan,” noting that it includes all the elements needed for a stable and secure peace and ensures Israel’s existence for many years as a Jewish democratic state.

It also provides Palestinians with a full-fledged, demilitarized state dedicated to achieve safety and well-being.

He, however, criticized its unilateral implementation, stressing that ignoring the Palestinians will cause irreversible damage.

“It will undermine stability in the Middle East, affect the peace treaty with Jordan and may cause casualties among Israelis, harm the economy and diminish Israel's international position,” Shay said.



Sudan's RSF Agrees with UN on Steps to Ease Aid Delivery

Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
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Sudan's RSF Agrees with UN on Steps to Ease Aid Delivery

Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)

Sudan's Rapid Support Forces agreed with the United Nations on some steps to ease aid delivery in areas under its control, a member of the RSF told Reuters on Thursday.

The Sudanese army has not reached any understandings on aid delivers with the RSF, he added. It is unclear if these steps could be implemented without the army's participation.

Meanwhile, a key supply route into Sudan's Darfur region, deemed at risk of famine by a global monitor, has been cut off due to heavy rains, a World Food Program official told Reuters on Thursday.
The UN agency has described Sudan as the world's biggest hunger crisis, with the western Darfur region most at risk as Sudan's 15-month civil war that has displaced millions and sparked ethnic violence grinds on.
WFP's Country Director Eddie Rowe said thousands of tons of aid are stranded at the Tina crossing on the Chad border, prompting the body to reopen talks with the army-aligned government to open an alternative, all-weather crossing further south called Adre.
"You have these huge rivers. As I speak now, our convoy, which is supposed to move over 2000 metric tons is stranded," he told Reuters from Port Sudan. Asked on the status of the talks that resumed this week, he said: "It's 50/50.”
WFP is now seeking clearances to move a large 70-truck convoy via a little-used, over 1000 kilometer route from Port Sudan to Darfur which Rowe said will involve crossing the battle lines of both the Sudan Armed Forces, the Rapid Support Forces and various militias.
He added that this mostly desert route has worked in the past but outside of the rainy season and that the last journey took weeks and was "fraught with a lot of challenges.”
In a separate interview, Mona Rishmawi, a member of the UN Fact-Finding Mission on Sudan, told Reuters that she had met Darfur refugees in Chad who told her stories of escaping with virtually no water and eating grass along the route. "There's no doubt that people are starving," she said.