Clashes Erupt in Tripoli between GNA-Affiliated Militias

GNA chief Fayez al-Sarraj in a meeting with leaders of Sirte-al-Jufra Liberation Operations Room (GNA)
GNA chief Fayez al-Sarraj in a meeting with leaders of Sirte-al-Jufra Liberation Operations Room (GNA)
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Clashes Erupt in Tripoli between GNA-Affiliated Militias

GNA chief Fayez al-Sarraj in a meeting with leaders of Sirte-al-Jufra Liberation Operations Room (GNA)
GNA chief Fayez al-Sarraj in a meeting with leaders of Sirte-al-Jufra Liberation Operations Room (GNA)

Armed clashes erupted on Thursday between security members of the Government of National Accord (GNA) in the Libyan capital Tripoli.

Eyewitnesses said that the warring sides have used heavy and medium weapons.

The clash took place between the General Security Force and the Deterrence Force in the Andalus neighborhood, in the center of Tripoli.

No official statements were made by the government or security bodies. However, sources revealed that the clashes followed a dispute between GNA-affiliated militias.

This came as GNA Chief Fayez Al-Sarraj vowed to pay all dues for the fighting forces and compensate wounded individuals, according to Libyan sources.

He delivered his remarks during a meeting he held with military leaders, representatives from noble councils, businessmen, and Misrata municipality.

Meanwhile, the United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) on Wednesday called for the unification of the country's electoral authorities for the municipal council elections.

Remarkably, Libya’s political process continues to make progress through the Libyan Political Dialogue Forum (LPDF) towards securing the necessary conditions for the holding of national elections on December 24, 2021.

The Mission urged all Libyan stakeholders, institutions, and actors involved in municipal elections, including the eastern-based House of Representatives, to support and facilitate cooperation between the two electoral entities of the capital Tripoli and the eastern city of Benghazi, as an essential step towards the unification of Libyan institutions.



US Military Targets Houthi Radar Sites in Yemen

In this photo provided by the Ministry of Defense (MoD), a Sea Viper missile is launched from HMS Diamond to shoot down a missile fired by the Iranian-backed Houthis from Yemen, Wednesday, April 24, 2024. (AP)
In this photo provided by the Ministry of Defense (MoD), a Sea Viper missile is launched from HMS Diamond to shoot down a missile fired by the Iranian-backed Houthis from Yemen, Wednesday, April 24, 2024. (AP)
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US Military Targets Houthi Radar Sites in Yemen

In this photo provided by the Ministry of Defense (MoD), a Sea Viper missile is launched from HMS Diamond to shoot down a missile fired by the Iranian-backed Houthis from Yemen, Wednesday, April 24, 2024. (AP)
In this photo provided by the Ministry of Defense (MoD), a Sea Viper missile is launched from HMS Diamond to shoot down a missile fired by the Iranian-backed Houthis from Yemen, Wednesday, April 24, 2024. (AP)

The United States military unleashed a wave of attacks targeting radar sites operated by Yemen's Houthi militants over their assaults on shipping in the crucial Red Sea corridor, authorities said Saturday, after one merchant sailor went missing following an earlier Houthi strike on a ship.
The attacks come as the US Navy faces the most intense combat it has seen since World War II in trying to counter the Houthi campaign — attacks the militants say are meant to halt the Israel-Hamas war in the Gaza Strip.
However, the Iranian-backed group assaults often see the Houthis target ships and sailors who have nothing to do with the war while traffic remains halved through a corridor vital for cargo and energy shipments between Asia, Europe and the Mideast.
US strikes destroyed seven radars within Houthi-controlled territory, the military's Central Command said. It did not elaborate on how the sites were destroyed and did not immediately respond to questions from The Associated Press.
“These radars allow the Houthis to target maritime vessels and endanger commercial shipping,” Central Command said in a statement.
The US separately destroyed two bomb-laden drone boats in the Red Sea, as well as a drone launched by the Houthis over the waterway, it said.
The Houthis, who have held Yemen's capital, Sanaa, since 2014, did not acknowledge the strikes, nor any military losses. That's been typical since the US began launching airstrikes targeting the group.
Meanwhile, Central Command said one commercial sailor from the Liberian-flagged, Greek-owned bulk cargo carrier Tutor remained missing after an attack Wednesday by the Houthis that used a bomb-carrying drone boat to strike the vessel.
“The crew abandoned ship and were rescued by USS Philippine Sea and partner forces,” Central Command said. The “Tutor remains in the Red Sea and is slowly taking on water.”
The Houthis have launched more than 50 attacks on shipping, killed three sailors, seized one vessel and sunk another since November, according to the US Maritime Administration.
The war in the Gaza Strip has killed more than 37,000 Palestinians there, according to Gaza health officials, while hundreds of others have been killed in Israeli operations in the West Bank. It began after Hamas-led militants attacked Israel on Oct. 7, killing about 1,200 people and taking around 250 hostage.
“The Houthis claim to be acting on behalf of Palestinians in Gaza and yet they are targeting and threatening the lives of third-country nationals who have nothing to do with the conflict in Gaza,” Central Command said. “The ongoing threat to international commerce caused by the Houthis in fact makes it harder to deliver badly needed assistance to the people of Yemen as well as Gaza.”