Israel Wants US, Egypt, Qatar to Press Abbas for Calm

A Palestinian child plays with a toy pistol during the funeral of Hamad Mustafa Abu Jeldah in Jenin refugee camp in the West Bank (AFP)
A Palestinian child plays with a toy pistol during the funeral of Hamad Mustafa Abu Jeldah in Jenin refugee camp in the West Bank (AFP)
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Israel Wants US, Egypt, Qatar to Press Abbas for Calm

A Palestinian child plays with a toy pistol during the funeral of Hamad Mustafa Abu Jeldah in Jenin refugee camp in the West Bank (AFP)
A Palestinian child plays with a toy pistol during the funeral of Hamad Mustafa Abu Jeldah in Jenin refugee camp in the West Bank (AFP)

Israel wants Egypt and Qatar to pressure Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to activate the security forces and prevent armed operations during the upcoming Jewish holidays.

The Palestinian Foreign Ministry said Israel is responsible for the ongoing escalation, saying it regularly targets Palestinian citizens with the worst forms of persecution and oppression without being held accountable.

The Foreign Ministry added in a press statement Sunday that the Israeli government and its various military branches, including the settlers' militias, organizations, and terrorists, are part of an Israeli strategy to escalate the conflict.

"The Israeli government is fully and directly responsible for the escalation."

The Ministry noted that the Israeli government's policy aims to keep the situation very tense to block any opportunity for the resumption of the peace process that had been stalled since 2014.

It denounced that more than one Israeli official held the Palestinian side responsible for the escalation and its repercussions in an attempt to evade responsibility and as part of Israel's official misleading campaigns.

The Ministry accused Israel of adopting a military-security approach in dealing with the Palestinian issue as an alternative to political solutions to the conflict.

Political sources in Tel Aviv revealed that the Israeli government sought Cairo, Doha, and Washington to pressure Abbas to activate the Palestinian security services to carry out arrest campaigns against Palestinian militants in the West Bank, especially in Jenin and Nablus.

According to Haaretz, Israel is facing difficulty finding goodwill initiatives and restoring confidence between the two parties or taking economic steps that could reduce security tension in the West Bank.

Tel Aviv claimed several serious warnings that the Palestinians are preparing for dozens of armed operations during the Jewish holidays in September and October.

The newspaper noted that the Fatah movement is among the organizations preparing for the operations, not just Palestinian opposition factions.

Israeli forces are carrying out the most significant arrests throughout the West Bank daily since the formation of the cabinet led by Naftali Bennett and then Yair Lapid, which has so far included more than 1,500 detainees.

Each arrest is carried out with a massive military campaign, with the participation of hundreds of soldiers, armored cars, and sometimes drones.

Haaretz reported that the Israeli political leadership is anxious that Abbas's expected speech at the United Nations General Assembly will escalate the situation.

According to the newspaper, Abbas's visit to Cairo last Monday focused on this issue.

The US Assistant Secretary of State for Middle Eastern Affairs, Barbara Leaf, also tried to pressure the Palestinians in this direction during her meeting with Minister Hussein al-Sheikh and intelligence chief Majed Faraj.

Leaf called on the Palestinians to withdraw their request for the United Nations to recognize Palestine as a member state, claiming that this would lead to an escalation in the West Bank. Abbas refused to meet Leaf.

An Israeli source familiar with the matter claimed that Abbas does not realize the depth of the problem.



Sudan's RSF Agrees with UN on Steps to Ease Aid Delivery

Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
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Sudan's RSF Agrees with UN on Steps to Ease Aid Delivery

Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)

Sudan's Rapid Support Forces agreed with the United Nations on some steps to ease aid delivery in areas under its control, a member of the RSF told Reuters on Thursday.

The Sudanese army has not reached any understandings on aid delivers with the RSF, he added. It is unclear if these steps could be implemented without the army's participation.

Meanwhile, a key supply route into Sudan's Darfur region, deemed at risk of famine by a global monitor, has been cut off due to heavy rains, a World Food Program official told Reuters on Thursday.
The UN agency has described Sudan as the world's biggest hunger crisis, with the western Darfur region most at risk as Sudan's 15-month civil war that has displaced millions and sparked ethnic violence grinds on.
WFP's Country Director Eddie Rowe said thousands of tons of aid are stranded at the Tina crossing on the Chad border, prompting the body to reopen talks with the army-aligned government to open an alternative, all-weather crossing further south called Adre.
"You have these huge rivers. As I speak now, our convoy, which is supposed to move over 2000 metric tons is stranded," he told Reuters from Port Sudan. Asked on the status of the talks that resumed this week, he said: "It's 50/50.”
WFP is now seeking clearances to move a large 70-truck convoy via a little-used, over 1000 kilometer route from Port Sudan to Darfur which Rowe said will involve crossing the battle lines of both the Sudan Armed Forces, the Rapid Support Forces and various militias.
He added that this mostly desert route has worked in the past but outside of the rainy season and that the last journey took weeks and was "fraught with a lot of challenges.”
In a separate interview, Mona Rishmawi, a member of the UN Fact-Finding Mission on Sudan, told Reuters that she had met Darfur refugees in Chad who told her stories of escaping with virtually no water and eating grass along the route. "There's no doubt that people are starving," she said.