Paris Fashion Week Prepares for Balmain Fashion Festival

Models present creations by designer Dries Van Noten as part of his Spring-Summer 2023 Women's ready-to-wear collection show during Paris Fashion Week in Paris, France, September 28, 2022. (Reuters)
Models present creations by designer Dries Van Noten as part of his Spring-Summer 2023 Women's ready-to-wear collection show during Paris Fashion Week in Paris, France, September 28, 2022. (Reuters)
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Paris Fashion Week Prepares for Balmain Fashion Festival

Models present creations by designer Dries Van Noten as part of his Spring-Summer 2023 Women's ready-to-wear collection show during Paris Fashion Week in Paris, France, September 28, 2022. (Reuters)
Models present creations by designer Dries Van Noten as part of his Spring-Summer 2023 Women's ready-to-wear collection show during Paris Fashion Week in Paris, France, September 28, 2022. (Reuters)

Paris Fashion Week roared into full gear Wednesday with atmospherics and palpable anticipation of Balmain’s evening fashion festival spectacular — a star-studded charity concert featuring the latest fashions, members of the public and secret celebrity performances.

Here are some highlights of spring-summer 2023 shows:

Courreges’ sands

For Courreges, a circular sandy runway featured a falling column of sand at its center evoking the sands of time — or the movie “Dune.” Off-kilter and slightly unnerving musical cadences in the soundtrack endowed the show with a sanitized, pared-down spirit.

Courreges has become a brand that touts a signature mood over a signature style, and designer Nicolas Di Felice likes to inject his fashion with atmosphere.

The spring-summer fashions began with a play of the crisp white shirt, with a voluminous shirt dress carrying the simple and sporty vibe well. Models sometimes had bare feet or nude footwear.

Di Felice used the runway to bring fashion-forward twists — snipaways, toggles, sheeny space materials and deconstruction — on everyday items such as a denim jacket, denim skirt or flared pants. A sporty vest, for example, was given a kinky side with its sheer materials.

It’s an approach that works well for the generation-defining brand founded in 1961 by André Courrèges and his wife, Coqueline, that became synonymous with the Space Age aesthetic.

The art of the invitation

The age of email and rising environmental awareness doesn’t seem to have left much of a mark on the fashion industry’s antiquated system of invitations.

Season after season, gasoline-guzzling couriers crisscross Paris to personally deliver ever-more-elaborate, often handmade, show invites.

Top houses vie for the wackiest or most imaginative idea that often bears a clue as to the theme of the runway collection.

For Loewe’s invitation, a bright red tropical flower came through the post that the floral dictionary identified as an anthurium. To keep the flower alive for the duration of Fashion Week, the bottom of the bloom’s stem was attached to a state-of-the-art humidity capsule.

Saint Laurent’s invite, meanwhile, was a chic black patent leather wallet with a metallic “YSL” on top, with the show card hidden inside.

Dries Van Noten lets loose

The Belgian fashion master was back on form for spring with a typically unpindownable collection held together only, it seemed, by the aesthetic of its looseness.

All-black ensembles -- an oversized menswear tuxedo worn on a bare chest, or an Asian crossover coat -- suddenly blossomed within the 64-look-collection into bright sequins, pastels, ruffles and florals.

There were artistic plays aplenty: One lace-like black top had ribbing evoking bones, all the while looking somewhat Elizabethan. The female models were chosen for their boyish looks, alongside myriad menswear twists on the womenswear wardrobe.

The one running theme seemed to be the softness: floppy layers of fabric, draped tassels that caressed the warehouse venue floor and the generous proportions in sleeves, skirts and billowing pants.

This was Van Noten, an original, having fun.

Undercover slashes it up

It was dressy with a difference at Jun Takahashi’s brand Undercover.

The streetwear-infused Japanese designer went slashing mad this season, lobbing the shoulder off a bright yellow oversized tuxedo, putting rips in a dressy white shirt and severing suit sleeves, pants and the lapel on an otherwise sophisticated double-breasted jacket.

As in previous seasons, Japanese anime felt omnipresent. Here, there was a cartoonish vibe in the double top-knot hairstyles worn by several of the models.

Statement T-shirts with “Love” and “Dream” on them added to the animation vibe.



Hermes Shows Breezy Summer Styles for Men on Paris Runway

Models present creations from the Hermes Spring/Summer 2025 menswear ready to wear collection as part of Paris Fashion Week in Paris, on June 22, 2024. (AFP)
Models present creations from the Hermes Spring/Summer 2025 menswear ready to wear collection as part of Paris Fashion Week in Paris, on June 22, 2024. (AFP)
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Hermes Shows Breezy Summer Styles for Men on Paris Runway

Models present creations from the Hermes Spring/Summer 2025 menswear ready to wear collection as part of Paris Fashion Week in Paris, on June 22, 2024. (AFP)
Models present creations from the Hermes Spring/Summer 2025 menswear ready to wear collection as part of Paris Fashion Week in Paris, on June 22, 2024. (AFP)

With pleated Bermuda shorts, muted pastels and cinched parkas, French label Hermes presented a breezy summer 2025 collection at Paris Men's Fashion Week that was marked by light, natural materials.

There were few patterns on display as models wearing leather sandals with criss-crossed straps strode down the runway in short-sleeved overshirts, light-weight jackets and tailored trousers made from fabrics such as canvas and crepe cotton twill.

They carried bags in denim canvas as well as a calfskin version of the label's roomy Bolide model in the latest collection presented by Veronique Nichanian, the fashion house's longtime artistic director for menswear.

Paris Men's Fashion Week takes place this year as the luxury sector faces slowing demand for clothing and accessories, especially in China, a key market, where shoppers of high-end fashion are seeking more discreet styles.

The shows, which have included outings from LVMH-owned labels Louis Vuitton and Dior, wind up on Sunday, and will be followed by Haute Couture week.