Libya Presidential Council Again Calls for Ending Centralization in Tripoli

People watch kitesurfers practice on the Mediterranean shore of Libya's capital Tripoli, on October 1, 2022. (AFP)
People watch kitesurfers practice on the Mediterranean shore of Libya's capital Tripoli, on October 1, 2022. (AFP)
TT

Libya Presidential Council Again Calls for Ending Centralization in Tripoli

People watch kitesurfers practice on the Mediterranean shore of Libya's capital Tripoli, on October 1, 2022. (AFP)
People watch kitesurfers practice on the Mediterranean shore of Libya's capital Tripoli, on October 1, 2022. (AFP)

Vice President of the Libyan Presidential Council Musa al-Koni reiterated the need to end centralization in the capital Tripoli.

He said limiting the presence of state institutions in the capital “makes it a target to those eyeing power or wealth.”

Koni has been promoting the idea for around a month now, holding various meetings with figures from Misrata, as well as with international officials.

He met on Sunday with civil society activists and senior officials from Tripoli.

A statement from his office said “he realizes the extent of the suffering Tripoli is suffering because central state institutions are located in the capital.”

The meeting tackled the benefits of a decentralized system “to fend off threats against the capital.”

Koni recalled that Libya used to be governed by a provincial system. Such a system is able to achieve justice, fairly distribute state revenues, immediately respond to demands, and impose security and stability throughout the country.

Libya has been governed by various systems since its independence in 1951. It tried the federal, provincial and municipal systems until centralization was introduced after the ouster and killing of longtime ruler Moammar al-Gaddafi in 2011.

The Presidential Council is seeking to reinstate the provincial system that was in place before 1969 with the aim to “limit struggles over power.”

Politicians, however, believe that ending centralization demands a new constitution and wide political agreement, as well as stability at state institutions.

They told Asharq Al-Awsat that ever since assuming power, the council had declared various initiatives but failed to achieve any of them.



Netanyahu Warns a Lebanon War Could be Next

FILE - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a news conference in the Kirya military base in Tel Aviv, Israel, on Oct. 28, 2023. (Abir Sultan/Pool Photo via AP, File)
FILE - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a news conference in the Kirya military base in Tel Aviv, Israel, on Oct. 28, 2023. (Abir Sultan/Pool Photo via AP, File)
TT

Netanyahu Warns a Lebanon War Could be Next

FILE - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a news conference in the Kirya military base in Tel Aviv, Israel, on Oct. 28, 2023. (Abir Sultan/Pool Photo via AP, File)
FILE - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a news conference in the Kirya military base in Tel Aviv, Israel, on Oct. 28, 2023. (Abir Sultan/Pool Photo via AP, File)

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Sunday that the current phase of fighting against Hamas in Gaza is winding down, setting the stage for Israel to send more troops to its northern border to confront Hezbollah.

The Israeli leader said in a lengthy TV interview that while the army is close to completing its current ground offensive in the southern Gaza city of Rafah, that would not mean the war against Hamas is over. But he said fewer troops would be needed in Gaza, freeing up forces to battle Hezbollah.

“We will have the possibility of transferring some of our forces north, and we will do that,” he told Israel’s Channel 14, a pro-Netanyahu TV channel, in an interview that was frequently interrupted by applause from the studio audience. “First and foremost, for defense,” he added, but also to allow tens of thousands of displaced Israelis to return home.

Netanyahu said he hoped a diplomatic solution to the crisis could be found but vowed to solve the problem “in a different way” if needed. ″We can fight on several fronts and we are prepared to do that,” he said.
He said any deal would not just be “an agreement on paper.” He said it would require Hezbollah to be far from the border, an enforcement mechanism and the return of Israelis back to their homes. Tens of thousands of people were evacuated shortly after the fighting erupted and have not been able to go home.

Hezbollah has said it will continue battling Israel until a cease-fire is reached in Gaza. The group’s leader, Hassan Nasrallah, warned Israel last week against launching a war, saying Hezbollah has new weapons and intelligence capabilities that could help it target more critical positions deeper inside Israel.